Buying bikes in France

We're often asked about buying bikes in France. How? Where from? How much? New or second-hand? Here are some tips.

Buying bicycles in france

Andrew's Specialized Roubaix, picked up half-price as an ex-rental (with not a scratch on it) from a French bike hire firm.

For info on buying bike rack carriers for cars, see this page.

Buying a bike can work out financially cheaper than hiring a bike – particularly for longer cycling holidays in France (if you're not sure, we can help you gauge the costs of hiring via our bespoke bike hire service).

However buying a bike in France is not without complications. Whether it's worth the hassle depends on a number of factors:

  • Your budget and the type of bikes you want
  • Whether you want to buy new or second-hand
  • Your route – more populated areas obviously have more options
  • Your time – do you have time before your trip to research and buy a bike?
  • What will you do with the bike at the end of the trip?

Buying second-hand bikes in France

Buying online: The go-to place for second-hand bikes (and everything else) is leboncoin.fr – it's the Craig's List or Gumtree of France. French people use it to sell anything and everything, it is very popular.  If you're looking to buy a cheap all-rounder, then there could be some bargains to be had. Try also troc-velo.com and paruvendu.fr (these sites also have professional sellers with new bikes).  

These sites are fairly easy to use, with the first step to simply select the region in which you wish to search. Then you can enter specific criteria i.e. velo, velo route (road bike), velo VTT (MTB), velo VTC (touring bike), remorque (trailer) etc. It does take time – you may need to wade through a lot of rubbish to find that golden nugget. You then email or call the seller and make arrangements to see to see/buy the bike. Bear in mind sellers will invariably be French and there is no guarantee they will speak English (Google Translate is your friend if the seller is happy to deal via email). Note if you are planning in advance, the seller may want to sell sooner than later and you need to be confident the bike will still be there when you arrive (paying in advance is a good idea).

You can use the same strategy in reverse to sell the bike at the end of your trip, but again bear in mind the extra hassle and time this may involve, and that most buyers will want to see the bike before agreeing to tke it. Do you have time at the end of your trip to do this? 

Facebook: We run a Facebook group that allows people to post items for sale/wanted to buy. Come and say hello.

Buying in person: Brocantes and local markets are held in towns all over France every week. These are great places to pick up bargains, but obviously require you to be there to pick up a gem when you see it. Look also for a 'dépôt vente', which sell second-hand stuff on behalf of private sellers (kind of like an official/permanent garage sale).  

Local Decathlon stores (see below) sometimes have 'Trocathlon' sales where local people are allowed to bring their bikes in to sell second-hand (the shop takes a commission of the sale). These are advertised locally or check online for the store closest to your route. 

Our local tip (déchetterie) runs its own recycling unit where people drop off bikes (and all sorts of other things) that are too good to throw out. We bought our daughter's latest bike from our 'recyclage' for €60 – we priced a similar new bike with similar specs at Decathlon (see below) a week later and prices started at €600. Finding these bargains can be hit and miss and rely on local knowldege (and, of course, luck and time).  

Buying ex-rental: Depending on the time of year, it may be possible to pick up an ex-rental bike in good condition but at the fraction of a new bike price. We picked up a Specialized Roubaix for around 50% of the retail price one December. Join our Facebook group for contacts.

Buying new bikes

Buying in France: Less hassle, but more money would be to walk into the local Decathlon store. They have everything from bottom-of-the-range touring bikes and basic mountain bikes though to high-end road bikes (though you're more likely to look elsewere for the latter). Decathlon is a massive chain and for basic holiday purposes, they usually have something for everyone. They are also ideal for children's bikes, basic trailers and car bike racks. They carry a full range of accessories from inner tubes and tyres throgh to baskets, helmets and cycling clothes. They also have a servicing section so if you buy a second hand bike or need repairs during your ride then can probably be a useful stop. Our local Decathlon has basic touring bikes priced from around the €150 mark. 

Other sports chains include GoSport and Intersport for basic bikes. Local supermarkets also usually stock a range of basic bikes. Look for Carrefour, e.leclerc, Super U and Intermarche stores. All sell bikes of varying quality (and weight) from upwards of €100.

And, of course, most towns of a reasonable size will have a bike shop. While we'd love to advocate supporting local shops, the reality in France is that buying bikes locally can be expensive. Almost always, a basic touring bike to get you through a 2-4-week trip in France will be cheaper at one of the above options than in a dedicated bike store. I hate typing that but it's the reality. Look for 'soldes' or sales.

For tandems, try Velo Tandem

Buying online: Bearing in mind what I said above about price, many people coming to France buy online and have the bikes shipped to France (for free) to their first hotel. 

Decathlon ship all over France if you don't have time to visit a store when you arrive. Wiggle and Chain Reaction Cycles both have French depots and an enormous range and variety of bike stuff that they ship free to French addresses. Halfords in the UK don't ship to France but it's easy enough to arrange for a bike to be shipped here direct and still save money (see this page). 

Want to hire instead? Used our bespoke service

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